Monthly Archives: November 2016

The largest publicly traded corporation

Apple CEO Tim Cook will deliver the address at MIT’s 2017 Commencement exercises on Friday, June 9.

Cook joined Apple in 1998 and was named its CEO in 2011. As chief executive, he has overseen the introduction of some of Apple’s innovative and popular products, including iPhone 7 and Apple Watch. An advocate for equality and champion of the environment, Cook reminds audiences that Apple’s mission is to change the world for the better, both through its products and its policies.

“Mr. Cook’s brilliance as a business leader, his genuineness as a human being, and his passion for issues that matter to our community make his voice one that I know will resonate deeply with our graduates,” MIT President L. Rafael Reif says. “I am delighted that he will join us for Commencement and eagerly await his charge to the Class of 2017.”

Before becoming CEO, Cook was Apple’s chief operating officer, responsible for the company’s worldwide sales and operations, including management of Apple’s global supply chain, sales activities, and service and support. He also headed the Macintosh division and played a key role in the development of strategic reseller and supplier relationships, ensuring the company’s flexibility in a demanding marketplace.

“Apple stands at the intersection of liberal arts and technology, and we’re proud to have many outstanding MIT graduates on our team,” Cook says. “We believe deeply that technology can be a powerful force for good, and I’m looking forward to speaking to the Class of 2017 as they look ahead to making their own mark on the world.”

Prior to joining Apple, Cook was vice president of corporate materials at Compaq, responsible for procuring and managing product inventory. Before that, he served as chief operating officer of the Reseller Division at Intelligent Electronics.

Cook also spent 12 years with IBM, ending as director of North American fulfillment, where he led manufacturing and distribution for IBM’s personal computer company in North and Latin America.

Cook earned a BS in industrial engineering from Auburn University in 1982, and an MBA from Duke University in 1988.

“Tim Cook is a trailblazer and an inspiration to innovators worldwide,” says Liana Ilutzi, president of MIT’s Class of 2017. “He represents the best of the entrepreneurial and fearless spirit of the MIT community. While faithfully maintaining his integrity and humility, Tim runs one of the most influential companies on the planet. We are beyond excited to have him with us for Commencement!”

“We are looking forward to hearing Tim Cook speak at Commencement,” says Graduate Student Council President Arolyn Conwill. “We believe that his innovative leadership at Apple, along with his commitment to advocacy on sustainability, security, and equality, will inspire graduates to make a far-reaching, positive impact on the world.”

Computer Machinery cites

This week the Association for Computer Machinery (ACM) announced its 2016 fellows, which include four principal investigators from MIT’s Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL): professors Erik Demaine, Fredo Durand, William Freeman, and Daniel Jackson. They were among the 1 percent of ACM members to receive the distinction.

“Erik, Fredo, Bill, and Daniel are wonderful colleagues and extraordinary computer scientists, and I am so happy to see their contributions recognized with the most prestigious member grade of the ACM,” says CSAIL Director Daniela Rus, who herself was named a fellow last year. “All of us at CSAIL are very proud of these researchers for receiving these esteemed honors.”

ACM’s 53 fellows for 2016 were named for their distinctive contributions spanning such computer science disciplines as computer vision, computer graphics, software design, machine learning, algorithms, and theoretical computer science.

“As nearly 100,000 computing professionals are members of our association, to be selected to join the top 1 percent is truly an honor,” says ACM President Vicki L. Hanson. “Fellows are chosen by their peers and hail from leading universities, corporations and research labs throughout the world. Their inspiration, insights and dedication bring immeasurable benefits that improve lives and help drive the global economy. ”

Demaine was selected for contributions to geometric computing, data structures, and graph algorithms. His research interests include the geometry of understanding how proteins fold and the computational difficulty of playing games. He received the MacArthur Fellowship for his work in computational geometry. He and his father Martin Demaine have produced numerous curved-crease sculptures that explore the intersection of science and art — and that are currently in the Museum of Modern Art in New York.

A Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS) professor whose research spans video graphics and photo-generation, Durand was selected for contributions to computational photography and computer graphics rendering. He also works to develop new algorithms to enable image enhancements and improved scene understanding. He received the ACM SIGGRAPH Computer Graphics Achievement Award in 2016.

Freeman is the Thomas and Gerd Perkins Professor of EECS at MIT. He was selected as a fellow for his contributions to computer vision, machine learning, and computer graphics. His research interests also include Bayesian models of visual perception and computational photography. He received “Outstanding Paper” awards at computer vision and machine learning conferences in 1997, 2006, 2009 and 2012, as well as ACM’s “Test of Time” awards for papers from 1990 and 1995.